Sunday, May 17, 2015

Why Writing a Bestseller is like picking a Blockbuster Stock, on the Saturday Evening Blog Post.

 The Saturday Evening Blog Post presents: Why Writing a Bestseller is like Picking a Blockbuster Stock.


We have all heard the adage, buy low, sell high. It is a simple concept to understand, of course, but a difficult one to execute. Oftentimes, the opposite happens: after reading the buzz and the hype about how well Stock A is doing, the average investor buys Stock A only to see its price dwindle. It might make you feel better to know that the exact same thing happens to authors trying to write a bestseller. The author is affected by almost the same buzz and hype as the investor, and similarly wants to get in on the action, only in this case the action is writing a book to take advantage of the trend. Think of all the blockbusters that spawned scores and scores of copycats and lookalikes and me-toos: Dan Brown's The DaVinci Code; JK Rowling's Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone; Stieg Larrson's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo; Suzanne Collins' The Hunger Games trilogy; Stephenie Meyer's Twilight Saga.  


There are many more (please leave any notable trendsetters in the comments section) but I think I made my point. By the time the author reads The DaVinci Code, decides she can write something along the same lines, and then writes, edits and submits it to agents and/or publishers, there are thousands of manuscripts with a similar premise. When I was searching for an agent, almost every website I visited said, No More DaVinci Code Spin-Offs, because by this time the market had been saturated with thrillers featuring the discovery of religious artifacts with the potential to change history (and the evil Catholic church trying to keep them hidden forever.)


The way to write a bestseller, then--like the way to finding a stock that will fund that yacht you are jonesing to buy--is to start your own trend. Yup, that's right, be your own trendsetter. It is, of course, easier said then done, which is why so few authors have accomplished it. Making it even harder, is the hard, cold fact that once you have done that (conceived, written, and edited the book that is unique and different) you have to convince an agent and then a publisher that it will sell--not an easy task.

Consider JK Rowling's plight. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone was rejected by a dozen publishing houses. You heard me, the best selling book series of all time was passed on by twelve editors before a small publishing house named Bloomsbury took a chance on it. (Do you think any of those dozen editors would like a do-over on that decision?) Rejecting HP is similar to skipping over Tom Brady in the NFL draft (he was ultimately picked in the sixth round, after six other quarterbacks had been chosen.) In the context of the paradigm I have chosen, rejecting HP is like being given a tip to buy Apple stock on 12/1/08, when the closing price was 11.55$ a share. (APL closed at 112.54 on 12/1/14, a ten-fold increase in six years, meaning a 50,000$ investment in '08 would be worth over a half-million dollars six years later.) 



Let's get back to the author's conundrum. Every author wants to write a bestseller; to accomplish that, he or she has to start a trend (or change his or her name to James Patterson or Nora Roberts.) The problem with that--as evidenced by JK Rowling's difficulties--is convincing the right people that you are on to something. JK Rowling was told "not to lose her day job," which is especially humorous when you consider she was unemployed at the time. But I don't mean to pick on editors, who do, in general, an excellent job weeding out the wheat from the chaff. Is is just an extremely difficult undertaking, made even more challenging by the sheer number of people who want to be the next JK Rowling, as well as the significant cost of publishing a book, which makes it difficult for an editor to want to take a chance on a book which is new and different.

Like any other writer, I would love to write a bestselling book. To this end, I have attended numerous conferences and read scores of books on how to do just that. The advice is always the same: the key to writing a bestseller is to bring something new and different to the table. What I have learned from my experience since then is that new and different isn't enough on its own. Your book has to be new and different, yes, but also believable and riveting and fast-paced and full of genuine characters and on and on. You also have to have a bit of luck, and the timing needs to be right. (Picking a blockbuster stock needs timing and luck as well.)


It can be done, however: Gillian Flynn did it with Gone Girl and so did Paula Hawkins with Girl on the Train. (Maybe I should use the word girl in the title of my next book, seems to be a trend. Also, are there any stocks named 'girl?')

Ok, thanks again for tuning in, and don't forget to check out Prose & Cons, the literary blog for readers and writers. 

Cheers.
:)

Peter Hogenkamp is a physician and author living in Rutland, Vermont. Peter's writing credits include ABSOLUTION, the first book of The Jesuit thriller series; THE LAZARUS MANUSCRIPT, a stand-alone medical thriller; and The Intern, a serialized novel based loosely on Peter's internship, published bi-weekly on #Wattpad. Peter can be found on his Author Website as well as his personal blog, PeterHogenkampWrites, where he writes about most anything. Peter is the founder and editor of Prose&Consthe literary blog for readers and writers written by authors, editors, agents, publishers and poets; a frequent contributor and reviewer at ReadWave; the founder and moderator of groups on Facebook (The Library), Google+ (Fiction Writers Anonymous); and the chief of two tribes on Triberr, The Big Thrill and Fiction Writers. Peter tweets--against the wishes of his wife and four children--at @phogenkampvt and @theprosecons. Peter can be reached at peter@peterhogenkamp.com or through his literary agent (Liz Kracht of Kimberely Cameron & Associates) at liz@kimberleycameron.com.
  




Monday, May 11, 2015

Three Lessons from my Mother. #MothersDay


My mother is not a perfect person, but she's a happy one. It's #mothersday, and as I got up early to make breakfast for my wife (family tradition) I thought about why my mother has always been able to remain happy in an increasingly distressed and dysthymic world. As I waited for the griddle to achieve the perfect temperature, here's what I came up with:

My mother is a not a great cook (she never waited for the griddle to be thoroughly heated through) but her less than stellar performances in the kitchen never bothered her. The first lesson I learned from my mother: Don't dwell on the negative, emphasize the positive aspects of things. When my brothers and sisters would grouse about the pancakes being burned on the outside and uncooked in the middle, she would respond, "you're not starving are you?" And she was right, she raised four healthy children. The devil's advocate might rebut by saying, "that approach precluded her from learning from her mistakes." And while that is true, I ask you: What's more important, being happy, or cooking the perfect pancake? 


I managed to burn myself on the side of the griddle, reminding me of the time I accidentally tripped my mother while she was carrying bacon grease, resulting in a bad burn. I felt horrible, naturally, but what I remember most about the whole deal was how she never, not even once, complained. She sat quietly as I drove her to the hospital--even though I know from much experience that burns hurt a lot--and just went about her business when we got home. When she had hip surgery a few years ago, she refused all pain meds--even Tylenol. I often tell people that I could walk into her house and find three of her limbs on the ground, and she would say, "I'm fine, don't worry about me." She figured out a long time ago that complaining about things only makes them worse. My mother would tell you that her ability to live life without complaining is that she accepts things for what they are. 




Crap. I forgot to buy the blueberries for the pancakes, but I am going to take my cue from my mother who never sweats the small things. Yes, the blueberry pancakes would have been epic but chocolate chip pancakes are pretty good as well. I can remember my mother making a cake for my birthday, back in the day, and realizing we didn't have enough sugar. It would have been easy enough to go to the store, perhaps, but we had just got 4 feet of snow in the last 48 hours and we were not going anywhere. Not to worry, though, my mother substituted honey or molasses or maple syrup or whatever for the sugar and came up with a cake. So many people allow the small things to upset the whole apple cart. But not my mother, and that was the best birthday present, learning not to get derailed by things that don't really matter. 

(And the cake wasn't that bad either.)

Thanks, Mom.


Cheers.
:)

Peter Hogenkamp is a physician and author living in Rutland, Vermont. Peter's writing credits include ABSOLUTION, the first book of The Jesuit thriller series; THE LAZARUS MANUSCRIPT, a stand-alone medical thriller; and The Intern, a serialized novel based loosely on Peter's internship, published bi-weekly on #Wattpad. Peter can be found on his Author Website as well as his personal blog, PeterHogenkampWrites, where he writes about most anything. Peter is the founder and editor of Prose&Consthe literary blog for readers and writers written by authors, editors, agents, publishers and poets; a frequent contributor and reviewer at ReadWave; the founder and moderator of groups on Facebook (The Library), Google+ (Fiction Writers Anonymous); and the chief of two tribes on Triberr, The Big Thrill and Fiction Writers. Peter tweets--against the wishes of his wife and four children--at @phogenkampvt and @theprosecons. Peter can be reached at peter@peterhogenkamp.com or through his literary agent (Liz Kracht of Kimberely Cameron & Associates) at liz@kimberleycameron.com.
  




Monday, May 4, 2015

Book Review: All the Old Knives, by Olen Steinhauer


There comes a time in a writer's life where he really hits his stride, and that time is right now for Olen Steinhauer. You can tell a book is written well when the first thing you do upon finishing it is go back to the beginning, which is precisely what I did when I finished Steinhauer's latest novel, All the Old Knives. Having just read the end, I wanted to enjoy again the beginning; the way Steinhauer sets up the end, (but without giving it away); the way he ratchets up the suspense from the word Go; the way he immerses you into the story in the first few pages. I will say it again: All the Old Knives is written by a writer at the top of his craft.

All the Old Knives is unlike any other book you've read, as the entire book takes place during the course of a dinner shared by two old friends. It is a constraining story structure for sure, or would be if not for Olenhauer's skill, his ability to roam freely despite the limits. One gets the feeling he set out to challenge himself, to see if he could bring his writing up to another level by imposing limits and then transcending them. In any case, it is the reader who wins, who gets to reap the profits of Steinhauer 's finest work to date.



If you have read any of the author's earlier works, The Tourist series in particular, you will know that Steinhauer paints with a palette filled only with shades of grey. There are no good guys in Steinhauer's world, only guys (and gals) good and bad at the same time, spurred on by similar--if opposing--motivations. Realistic characters do result from this monochromatic scheme, but if I had to find a criticism, it would be that they are overly realistic and not as sympathetically drawn as they might be.

In All the Old Knives, Steinhauer finds a better balance. The flaws are there, for sure, in these so much less than perfect people he writes about, but this time you can feel for them on a more visceral level. And as always Steinhauer keeps you guessing until the very last paragraph. But All the Old Knives begins and ends with the writing, Steinhauer's cerebral prose that waxes poetic and flows easily. If you are looking for a book that keeps your eyes glued to the pages from start to finish, pick up a copy of All the Old Knives. You'll be a Steinhauer fan before the first chapter ends.

Here are a few other reviews of All the Old Knives:
New York Times
Washington Post
GoodReads


Cheers.
:)

Peter Hogenkamp is a physician and author living in Rutland, Vermont. Peter's writing credits include ABSOLUTION, the first book of The Jesuit thriller series; THE LAZARUS MANUSCRIPT, a stand-alone medical thriller; and The Intern, a serialized novel based loosely on Peter's internship, published bi-weekly on #Wattpad. Peter can be found on his Author Website as well as his personal blog, PeterHogenkampWrites, where he writes about most anything. Peter is the founder and editor of Prose&Consthe literary blog for readers and writers written by authors, editors, agents, publishers and poets; a frequent contributor and reviewer at ReadWave; the founder and moderator of groups on Facebook (The Library), Google+ (Fiction Writers Anonymous); and the chief of two tribes on Triberr, The Big Thrill and Fiction Writers. Peter tweets--against the wishes of his wife and four children--at @phogenkampvt and @theprosecons. Peter can be reached at peter@peterhogenkamp.com or through his literary agent (Liz Kracht of Kimberely Cameron & Associates) at liz@kimberleycameron.com.
  





Tuesday, April 28, 2015

How to write an Author Bio

You've just heard the good news that your dream agent wants your full manuscript. But there is a catch--she wants an author bio as well. Well, if you're JK Rowling, that is a mighty easy job: How does "Author of the most popular series of books in the history of publishing" grab you? Pretty good! The problem is, you are not JK Rowling. You are you, and you are reading this because an author bio was requested and you have no idea what to write.




The issue here isn't really about the writing itself--you are a writer, for heaven's sake--it's the lack of things to write about. If you were the lead correspondent for CNN, you would have written that; if you had ghostwritten three best-selling memoirs, you would have written that; if you were the world's leading expert on human cloning, you would have written that. But just because you are not any of these three things (or a host of others), does not mean you can't write. It does mean you will have work on your Author Bio, however. But there's hope. I have a solution to this issue, a solution which does not involve writing per se. My solution involves doing.

What am I talking about? Let me show you (remember, we're supposed to show, not tell). Here is my first--incredibly lame--author bio, which I wrote three years ago to send to any literary agent who requested it:


Peter Hogenkamp MD, Author Bio
I am a practicing physician and author living in Rutland, Vermont, with my wife and four children. After graduating from the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA, I lived for three years in Austria, during which time I taught chemistry at the Salzburg International Preparatory School and traveled extensively. I have numerous friends and family in Europe, and my wife and I visit yearly. This past summer, I visited family in Germany, and traveled to Italy and Spain afterwards—Thank you, Ryan Air—to research the second book of The Jesuit series, tentatively called Doubt.

See how I used up all the lines with fluff? (I took lessons from my high school student children--experts in the field!) That's because I had nothing to write. When I finally managed to sign with an agent (who says duct tape is overrated?) she gave me some great advice. Do stuff.

So I did stuff. When it came time to update my author bio three years later, I had stuff to put down, and instead of a liability, my author bio is now an asset. Here is my new one:

Peter Hogenkamp is a physician and author living in Rutland, Vermont. Peter's writing credits include ABSOLUTION, the first book of The Jesuit thriller series; THE LAZARUS MANUSCRIPT, a stand-alone medical thriller; and The Intern, a serialized novel based loosely on Peter's internship, published bi-weekly on #Wattpad. Peter can be found on his Author Website as well as his personal blog, PeterHogenkampWrites, where he writes about most anything. Peter is the founder and editor of Prose&Cons, the literary blog for readers and writers written by authors, editors, agents, publishers and poets; a frequent contributor and reviewer at ReadWave; the founder and moderator of groups on Facebook (The Library), Google+ (Fiction Writers Anonymous); and chief of two tribes on Triberr, The Big Thrill and Fiction Writers. Peter tweets--against the wishes of his wife and four children--at @phogenkampvt and @theprosecons. He can be reached at peter@peterhogenkamp.com or through his literary agent (Liz Kracht of Kimberely Cameron & Associates) at liz@kimberleycameron.com

See what I mean? I actually had to cut some stuff out to keep it down to a manageable length. Please note that none of this stuff was beyond anyone's reach, either talent or wallet wise. All it takes is doing. And time, as my wife likes to point out, although the time can be anytime you want it to be. I do most of my stuff early in the morning before my family wakes up; night owls can do it after people are asleep. There is time, believe me; you just have to stop watching TV (unless #GameOfThrones is on.)

I'll end here. Note that what follows is my Author Bio--I use it all the time. Feel free to use some of the ideas I had, but keep one last thing in mind. If you are going to be a Triberr chief, be a good Triberr chief. Don't just do things to put on your resume; do them well and it will pay dividends. (And if anyone wants to contribute to Prose&Cons, message me at peter@peterhogenkamp.com)

Cheers.
:)

Peter Hogenkamp is a physician and author living in Rutland, Vermont. Peter's writing credits include ABSOLUTION, the first book of The Jesuit thriller series; THE LAZARUS MANUSCRIPT, a stand-alone medical thriller; and The Intern, a serialized novel based loosely on Peter's internship, published bi-weekly on #Wattpad. Peter can be found on his Author Website as well as his personal blog, PeterHogenkampWrites, where he writes about most anything. Peter is the founder and editor of Prose&Cons, the literary blog for readers and writers written by authors, editors, agents, publishers and poets; a frequent contributor and reviewer at ReadWave; the founder and moderator of groups on Facebook (The Library), Google+ (Fiction Writers Anonymous); and the chief of two tribes on Triberr, The Big Thrill and Fiction Writers. Peter tweets--against the wishes of his wife and four children--at @phogenkampvt and @theprosecons. Peter is He can be reached at peter@peterhogenkamp.com or through his literary agent (Liz Kracht of Kimberely Cameron & Associates) at liz@kimberleycameron.com.
  

 
 

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Comings and Goings


From the last chapter of The Intern:

How long Maggie remained there, crying in the dark, she would never be sure. Time lost definition in that murky, airless cubicle; the only thing she was aware of was her sorrow and a strong sense of unfairness. It was unfair, she thought, that anyone would come into the world the way Bobby had, spit out from his crack-head mother's womb under a bridge. It was unfair he had lived his whole life in a succession of foster homes and charitable institutions, never having experienced the comfort and solace of a real home. It was unfair he had been diagnosed with cancer at age seven, a high grade leukemia against which all the weapons of modern medicine had proven useless. And it was unfair--terribly, grossly unfair--he had died alone, without Maggie there to hold his hand as he passed from this world into the next.

 This paragraph is from the last chapter of The Intern, the novella I have just finished publishing on Wattpad. I am posting it here for a reason (a reason other than the obvious one that I am trying to pique your interest and get you to read the story:) this is exactly how I felt when a young boy on my service died, twenty years ago. (The circumstances were different, yes, but my reaction was Maggie's reaction, proving my point that details and names may fade with time, but emotions endure.)

My gut twists when I read the last chapter--and that's either good writing or the lentil soup I had for dinner last night. Here's another excerpt, from later in the chapter. Maggie is reading a letter Bobby wrote to her before he died:

Before I met you, I wanted to be forgotten, as if my whole life had never happened. What good had ever come out of my life? You changed that for me, because you were the only person I have ever loved. A live without love should be forgotten, like the dead rat I was once found in the sewer behind my foster home. But not a live with love. A live with love is immortal.
Please remember me.

Ok, that's enough. And don't worry about spoilers, because the reader is aware in the first paragraph of the story that Bobby doesn't survive. I did that because I didn't want the reader to focus on what was going to happen, but rather the effect of what was happening on the characters. I hope you'll take a look.

I started The Intern because I wanted to write a work loosely based on my internship. I kept writing it because I formed a bond with with two of the characters. When I finished it, after the usual relief and gratification had worn off, I started to miss Maggie and Bobby and the rest of the cast. So I am bringing Maggie back, in a book set two years after the end of her internship. The plot is one that I have been working out in my head for several years, and it just occurred to me that Maggie would be the perfect protagonist. So The Intern may be going, but The Book To Be Named Later (catchy title, huh) is coming. And that's Comings and Goings for today.

Cheers.
:)

Peter Hogenkamp is a physician and author living in Rutland, Vermont. Peter's writing credits include ABSOLUTION, the first book of The Jesuit thriller series; THE LAZARUS MANUSCRIPT, a stand-alone medical thriller; and The Intern, a serialized novel based loosely on Peter's internship, published bi-weekly on #Wattpad. Peter can be found on his Author Website as well as his personal blog, PeterHogenkampWrites, where he writes about most anything. Peter is the founder and editor of Prose&Cons; a frequent contributor and reviewer at ReadWave; the founder and moderator of groups on Facebook (The Library), Google+ (Fiction Writers Anonymous); and a Beta-reader at StoryShelter. Peter tweets--against the wishes of his wife and four children--at @phogenkampvt and @theprosecons. He can be reached at peter@peterhogenkamp.com or through his literary agent (Liz Kracht of Kimberely Cameron & Associates) at liz@kimberleycameron.com.


 
   









Friday, April 10, 2015

5 Easy Steps to getting a Literary Agent!

You have finished your novel, and your first queries to literary agents have met with little success. What now? You CAN get a literary agent, you just have to take the essential steps first. What are they? I am reposting a blog I wrote for the QueryTrackerBlog to help you on your quest to being agented and traditionally published. If you haven't signed up for QueryTracker yet, keep in mind that I wouldn't have signed with an agent without it.

The 5 Essential Steps to Getting a Literary Agent


It was seven years ago, but I can remember it like it was today. I woke up on the day before Thanksgiving, booted up my computer, and saw the e-mail in my inbox. "I have reviewed your query letter and the first five pages of your manuscript and I would like to read more; can you please e-mail me the first 50 pages along with your author bio and and a list of comparable titles."

Now, by virtue of the fact that you are reading this blog on QueryTracker, I suspect you all have received similar e-mails and realize that this was no big deal. But it was a big deal to me at the time, and it is still something I remember fondly. I had sent this--my very first--query to Writers House (I am sure you all know what Writers House is) and gotten a request for a partial. Things fell apart from there, of course--the I regret to inform you e-mail followed shortly--but it was the first step of the 5 Essential Steps to Getting a Literary Agent.


Step 1)  Getting Your First Rejection.

Why, you ask, is this the first step? Well, consider the number of talented writers I know who have never received a rejection. The obvious reason is that none of them have ever sent a query letter in the first place. And why haven't they? The list is long--too much work, such a small chance of success, and not wanting to be slapped in the face top the list--but the reason doesn't really matter. If you are going to be a successful, agented and traditionally published author, you have got to put yourself out there--again and again--and in so doing you will be rewarded with rejections, apathy, criticism, (Sounds great, huh?) and the occasional positive response. Cherish the positive responses. Enjoying the small successes is the best way to keep on going.





Step 2)  Getting Your First Partial Request.

A request for a partial is not a guarantee you are going to be the next James Patterson or Daniel Silva, but it isn't a bad thing either: Someone (likely an intern or an agent's assistant) Somewhere (likely in NYC or San Francisco) thinks you can write. It is a validation of what you have known deep down all along. It is not a good thing: It is a great thing. But let's take a step back for a second, and do some math. Yes, yes, I know, they said there would be no math, but it is simple stuff and it makes my point. You sent out 10 queries and received 5 requests: What can you glean from this? You did a good job writing your query letter. On the other hand, if you sent out 20 queries and received just the 1 request, your query letter isn't any good. Revise it. (Here is the link to the QueryTracker Forum, where you can get great advice on how to improve your query.)



Step 3) Getting Your First Submission Request

After reviewing your partial, 10 agents have requested your full manuscript (this is what is called a submission request) but you get nothing but form rejections, lack of enthusiasm and, in many cases, nothing, in response. The fault here lies in your manuscript. I am not saying that your manuscript isn't any good, I am saying that it isn't good enough... yet. Getting an agent is a hard thing to do: Take a look at the acceptance rates on QueryTracker (and don't even consider the querying process without having QueryTracker on your Favorites list.) Many agents sign only one or two writers a year, some less than that. And many of the writers they sign come from referrals, not the slush pile. I am not saying you can't do it: my agent found me in the slush pile, and if I can do it, so can you. But you have to learn from the failures along the way. Kabitzing about how unfair the process is--or how arbitrary, or how frustrating--gets you nowhere. Asking yourself how you can improve is the correct approach. Go back to the comments you may have received; what are the agents telling you? Where is the weakness in your manuscript? Are your characters well-developed? Is your dialogue genuine? Is your prose tight? This is where you become a better writer: Don't waste the opportunity. Stop querying agents until you have fixed the problems with your manuscript; there are only so many agents who represent your genre. Stop querying. Start revising. Then query again. I say this from experience--this is the exact approach that worked for me in the end.



Step 4)  Getting Your First Revision Request

You may see this referred to as a Revise and Resubmit, but be careful: agents are very savvy about how they manage a writers expectations. You may need to read between the lines of their comments to realize you have received a revision request. What do I mean? Take my case. I worked very hard on revising my manuscript after it was rejected two dozen or so times at the submission level. I was fortunate to receive a lot of comments with the rejections, both good and bad, but let me tell you something: It is the bad comments you should be paying attention to. It is something you can work on. One agent told me: You write well, and I like the premise, but the main character isn't strong enough. That, my friends, was a revision request by my way of looking at it. So, that's what I did: I spent several months making the characters stronger and I sent it back to her with a carefully worded letter explaining that I had addressed the weaknesses of the manuscript and would she be interested in taking another look? (The key here is to be professional and polite.) In fact, I sent my revised manuscript to all the agents who had taken the time to make some comments (don't bother with the ones who sent form rejects or who didn't respond at all--they have no interest) and to the one agent who had specifically asked for a revise and resubmit. The agents who made comments were interested enough to spend some of their valuable time to help you: You owe it to them and to yourself to give them another shot. But only after you have worked hard to address the shortcomings in the manuscript.





Step 5)  Getting Your First Offer of Representation

Interestingly enough, the one agent who had specifically requested the R/R never even responded to my letter. Even when the offers started coming in and I let her know that I had several offers of representation, she simply said she was 'no longer interested.' (I wrote her back to thank her for help, by the way.) Her lack of interest didn't phase me, however, because I had received an offer. What to do in this case, when I still had another ten or so submissions out there? You want to let the agents know you have received an offer. They will either bow out (and save themselves some time) or expedite the reading of your manuscript in case they want to make an offer. I ended up with six offers in the next few weeks. (But just so we are clear, these six offers represented five years of querying, ten years of writing two different manuscripts, two writers conferences, and several laps of the earth trying to hike away my angst.) It can be done: You can get an agent through the querying process but it can only be done with a lot of hard work. Their are no shortcuts, no head starts, no tricks or gimmicks.

Just five steps.


Peter Hogenkamp is a physician and author living in Rutland, Vermont. Peter's writing credits include ABSOLUTION, the first book of The Jesuit thriller series; THE LAZARUS MANUSCRIPT, a stand-alone medical thriller; and The Intern, a serialized novel based loosely on Peter's internship, published bi-weekly on #Wattpad. Peter can be found on his Author Website as well as his personal blog, PeterHogenkampWrites, where he writes about most anything. Peter is the founder and editor of Prose&Cons; a frequent contributor and reviewer at ReadWave; the founder and moderator of groups on Facebook (The Library), Google+ (Fiction Writers Anonymous); and a Beta-reader at StoryShelter. Peter tweets--against the wishes of his wife and four children--at @phogenkampvt and @theprosecons. He can be reached at peter@peterhogenkamp.com or through his literary agent (Liz Kracht of Kimberely Cameron & Associates) at liz@kimberleycameron.com.

Thursday, April 2, 2015

If You Can't Beat Them...

As many of you will know, it's the 21st Century, the era of digitilization, a tough time for us old school hold-outs who still love books. Or is it? Now that I have finally decided that the internet is here to stay, I am going to utilize it to promote books and literature. (If only I had thought of this earlier!) Yes, that's right, I am going to harness the tremendous power of YouTube to bring books back into the limelight. Introducing The Book Vlog, on YouTube: where I spend less than 5 minutes every week vlogging about books you should be reading. Cuz if you can't beat them, join them.

Before we begin, keep in mind that the person you are about to see is not a professional actor, it's me. Also, the video is filmed with my Iphone, held in a toaster, which was how I managed to get the best angle (huge points for cinematography.) Having said that, It's about content, right? Good books=good content, or at least am I hoping. Ok, without further ado; The Book Vlog, Episode #1


Ok, so James Earls Jones still has job security... but I made my point, and it was good fun. Just in case I piqued anyone's interest, here are the links to the websites of the five authors we discussed:
Steve Berry's website
Preston & Child
Daniel Silva's website
Jim Satterfield's website
Olen Steinhauer's website
Peter Hogenkamp's website

Cheers.
:)
Peter Hogenkamp is a physician and author living in Rutland, Vermont. Peter's writing credits include ABSOLUTION, the first book of The Jesuit thriller series; THE LAZARUS MANUSCRIPT, a stand-alone medical thriller; and The Intern, a serialized novel based loosely on Peter's internship, published bi-weekly on #Wattpad. Peter can be found on his Author Website as well as his personal blog, PeterHogenkampWrites, where he writes about most anything. Peter is the founder and editor of Prose&Cons; a frequent contributor and reviewer at ReadWave; the founder and moderator of groups on Facebook (The Library), Google+ (Fiction Writers Anonymous); and a Beta-reader at StoryShelter. Peter tweets--against the wishes of his wife and four children--at @phogenkampvt and @theprosecons. He can be reached at peter@peterhogenkamp.com or through his literary agent (Liz Kracht of Kimberely Cameron & Associates) at liz@kimberleycameron.com.